Update on DACA/How To Tell Who Is Who In An Appeal

As promised, here is an update on the DACA case.

(To see the full docket in the Supreme Court, click here.  To see my recent post on the case and DOJ's attempt to obtain certiorari before judgment, click here).

Today (January 23) the Supreme Court issued the following order:

ORDER IN PENDING CASE
17-1003 DEPT. OF HOMELAND SEC., ET AL. V. REGENTS OF UNIV. OF CA, ET AL.
The motion of petitioners to expedite consideration of the
petition for a writ of certiorari before judgment is granted in
part. As respondents have agreed, they will file their briefs in opposition by February 2, 2018. 

The "granted in part" refers to the February 2, 2018, date for the respondents (the Regents of the University of California and the named parties with them) to file their brief(s) in opposition to DOJ's petition.  DOJ originally wanted the Court to order respondents to file on January 22.  Obviously, they didn't get the time frame they were seeking.  Failing that, the parties agreed on February 2 as the date to file the briefs in opposition.

The next scheduled Court conference after that date is February 16, with an order day on February 20 (the 19th is Presidents Day) although I would not be surprised to see a decision before then.

______________________________________________________

A Quick And Easy Guide To Telling Who's Who In An Appeal

Trial Level                              Appeal                  Supreme Court 
  
Plaintiff /                  Appellant: party bringing    Petitioner: party
Defendant                 the appeal (loser below)    seeking Supreme 
(party that                                                       Court review
brings the case/         Appellee: party against     Respondent: party
party against             whom the appeal is           opposed to 
whom                       brought (winner below)     Supreme Court
the case is                                                       review 
brought)                                                                                                                                                                                   
There can be other parties, such as intervenors (parties that join the case on either side) and amicus (from amicus curiae, "friend of the court", parties that support one side or the other, who, by leave of the court, express their views on the case, though not parties to the underlying litigation).  And also at the appellate level, both parties at the trial court can be both appellant and appellee (!).  But in most cases, this guide shows you who all the players are.  I hope it helps.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
                                          
                                                   

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Stare Decisis: What It Is, Why It Is Important, And More Controversial Than You Might Think (Oh, And Spider-Man)

Welcome to Ignorantia Legis Non Excusat!

Oral Argument: Carpenter v. United States: Audio, Transcript, Thoughts